Mild Neurocognitive Disorder

Criterion A

Evidence of modest cognitive decline from a previous level of performance in one or more cognitive domains (complex attention, executive function, learning and memory, language, perceptual motor, or social cognition) based on:

  1. Concern of the individual, a knowledgeable informant, or the clinician that there has been a significant decline in cognitive function; and
  2. A substantial impairment in cognitive performance, preferably documented by standardized neuropsychological testing or, in its absence, another quantified clinical assessment.

Criterion B

The cognitive deficits do not interfere with capacity for independence in everyday activities (i.e., complex instrumental activities of daily living such as paying bills or managing medications are preserved, but greater effort, compensatory strategies, or accommodation may be required).

Criterion C

The cognitive deficits do not occur exclusively in the context of a delirium.

Criterion D

The cognitive deficits are not better explained by another mental disorder (e.g., major depressive disorder, schizophrenia).

  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Major or Mild Frontotemporal Neurocognitive Disorder
  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder With Lewy Bodies
  • Major or Mild Vascular Neurocognitive Disorder
  • Substance/Medication-Induced Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder
  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to HIV Infection
  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to Prion Disease
  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to Parkinson’s Disease
  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to Huntington’s Disease
  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to Another Medical Condition
  • Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to Multiple Etiologies
  • Unspecified Neurocognitive Disorder