May 2019 By PsychDB.com

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cl:1-delirium [May 2019]
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cl:1-delirium [May 2019] (current)
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-==== Depression, Delirium, or Dementia? ==== +==== Dementia, ​Depression, or Delirium? ==== 
-<alert icon="​fa fa-arrow-circle-right fa-lg fa-fw" type="​success">​See also: **[[geri:​dementia:​home|]]**,​ **[[mood:​1-depression:​geriatric|]]**,​ [[cl:​1-delirium|]]</​alert>​+<alert icon="​fa fa-arrow-circle-right fa-lg fa-fw" type="​success">​See also: **[[geri:​dementia:​home|]]**,​ **[[mood:​1-depression:​geriatric|]]**, ​and [[cl:​1-delirium|]]</​alert>​
  
 In the geriatric population, it is important to differentiate between delirium, dementia, and depression, which can be difficult to distinguish.[([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC1124165/​|Brown,​ T. M., & Boyle, M. F. (2002). Delirium. Bmj, 325(7365), 644-647.]])][([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC4535349/​|Fong,​ T. G., Davis, D., Growdon, M. E., Albuquerque,​ A., & Inouye, S. K. (2015). The interface of delirium and dementia in older persons. The Lancet. Neurology, 14(8), 823.]])][([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC3065676/​table/​T1/?​report=objectonly|Fong,​ T. G., Tulebaev, S. R., & Inouye, S. K. (2009). Delirium in elderly adults: diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Nature reviews neurology, 5(4), 210.]])] The prevalence of delirium superimposed on dementia ranges anywhere from 22% to 89% of hospitalized and community populations aged 65 and older with dementia. The negative outcomes of these co-occuring conditions include accelerated and long-term cognitive, functional decline, institutionalization,​ re-hospitalization,​ and increased mortality.[([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pubmed/​12366629|Fick,​ D. M., Agostini, J. V., & Inouye, S. K. (2002). Delirium superimposed on dementia: a systematic review. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 50(10), 1723-1732.]])] In the geriatric population, it is important to differentiate between delirium, dementia, and depression, which can be difficult to distinguish.[([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC1124165/​|Brown,​ T. M., & Boyle, M. F. (2002). Delirium. Bmj, 325(7365), 644-647.]])][([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC4535349/​|Fong,​ T. G., Davis, D., Growdon, M. E., Albuquerque,​ A., & Inouye, S. K. (2015). The interface of delirium and dementia in older persons. The Lancet. Neurology, 14(8), 823.]])][([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC3065676/​table/​T1/?​report=objectonly|Fong,​ T. G., Tulebaev, S. R., & Inouye, S. K. (2009). Delirium in elderly adults: diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Nature reviews neurology, 5(4), 210.]])] The prevalence of delirium superimposed on dementia ranges anywhere from 22% to 89% of hospitalized and community populations aged 65 and older with dementia. The negative outcomes of these co-occuring conditions include accelerated and long-term cognitive, functional decline, institutionalization,​ re-hospitalization,​ and increased mortality.[([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pubmed/​12366629|Fick,​ D. M., Agostini, J. V., & Inouye, S. K. (2002). Delirium superimposed on dementia: a systematic review. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 50(10), 1723-1732.]])]