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meds:antipsychotics:home [2020/05/18 18:11]
psychdb [Potency]
meds:antipsychotics:home [2020/05/18 18:11] (current)
psychdb
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 <WRAP group> <WRAP group>
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-Antipsychotic function can best be understood by their degree of affinity for the dopamine receptor, or potency (i.e. - "how much of the drug you need to produce a clinical effect?"​).[([[https://​www.biomedcentral.com/​1471-244x/​9/​24/​table/​t1|Table 1: Antipsychotic equivalent doses and Defined Daily Doses of common antipsychotics.]])][([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC2693495/​pdf/​1471-244X-9-24.pdf|Kroken,​ Rune A et al. Treatment of Schizophrenia with Antipsychotics in Norwegian Emergency Wards, a Cross-Sectional National Study. BMC Psychiatry 9 (2009): 24.]])] This can be seen in the actual dose of the antipsychotic itself (for example, ​the therapeutic dose of risperidone (high potency) is 2-3 mg, whereas quetiapine (low potency) can be up to 800 mg).+Antipsychotic function can best be understood by their degree of affinity for the dopamine receptor, or potency (i.e. - "how much of the drug you need to produce a clinical effect?"​).[([[https://​www.biomedcentral.com/​1471-244x/​9/​24/​table/​t1|Table 1: Antipsychotic equivalent doses and Defined Daily Doses of common antipsychotics.]])][([[https://​www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/​pmc/​articles/​PMC2693495/​pdf/​1471-244X-9-24.pdf|Kroken,​ Rune A et al. Treatment of Schizophrenia with Antipsychotics in Norwegian Emergency Wards, a Cross-Sectional National Study. BMC Psychiatry 9 (2009): 24.]])] This can be seen in the actual dose of the antipsychotic itself (e.g. - the therapeutic dose of risperidone (high potency) is 2-3 mg, whereas quetiapine (low potency) can be up to 800 mg).
  
   * **High potency** (i.e. - you only need to prescribe a "low dose" to get a clinical effect)   * **High potency** (i.e. - you only need to prescribe a "low dose" to get a clinical effect)