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on-call:approach-to-im-on-call-emergencies-issues [2020/01/04 14:42]
psychdb
on-call:approach-to-im-on-call-emergencies-issues [2020/04/30 22:11] (current)
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 ====== Approach to On-Call Internal Medicine Emergencies and Issues ====== ====== Approach to On-Call Internal Medicine Emergencies and Issues ======
 +{{INLINETOC}}
 ===== Primer ===== ===== Primer =====
 **Common Internal Medicine** issues and emergencies for psychiatric patients may occur. It is important for any psychiatrist to have  a good approach to these issues and to direct the right work up and medical care. **Common Internal Medicine** issues and emergencies for psychiatric patients may occur. It is important for any psychiatrist to have  a good approach to these issues and to direct the right work up and medical care.
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 <WRAP group> <WRAP group>
 <WRAP half column> <WRAP half column>
-<callout type="​success">​{{fa>​arrow-circle-right?​color=green}} See main article: **[[neurology/​approaches/​1-neuro-emergencies#​altered-level-of-consciousness|Approach to Neurologic Emergencies:​ Altered Level of Consciousness]]**</​callout>​+<callout type="​success">​{{fa>​arrow-circle-right?​color=green}} See main article: **[[neurology:1-approach-neuro-emergencies#​altered-level-of-consciousness|Approach to Neurologic Emergencies:​ Altered Level of Consciousness]]**</​callout>​
  
 </​WRAP>​ </​WRAP>​
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 ===== Seizures ===== ===== Seizures =====
-<callout type="​success">​{{fa>​arrow-circle-right?​color=green}} See main article: **[[neurology:​approaches:seizures#​treatment|Approach to Seizures: Treatment]]**</​callout>​+<callout type="​success">​{{fa>​arrow-circle-right?​color=green}} See main article: **[[neurology:​approach-seizures#​treatment|Approach to Seizures: Treatment]]**</​callout>​
 If you witness a seizure, call for help, as the patient will likely have decreased LOC following the event. It is appropriate to call a code blue (“Medical Emergency”) if you need medications or more support. The first line treatment is with benzodiazepines either IV (preferred or IM). Give lorazepam 2mg, or midazolam 2mg, or diazepam 5mg q2-5minutes PRN until seizures are controlled. If not already on antiepileptics,​ it is reasonable to load them with dilantin (20mg/kg) to prevent further seizures. If you witness a seizure, call for help, as the patient will likely have decreased LOC following the event. It is appropriate to call a code blue (“Medical Emergency”) if you need medications or more support. The first line treatment is with benzodiazepines either IV (preferred or IM). Give lorazepam 2mg, or midazolam 2mg, or diazepam 5mg q2-5minutes PRN until seizures are controlled. If not already on antiepileptics,​ it is reasonable to load them with dilantin (20mg/kg) to prevent further seizures.
  
 ===== Resources ===== ===== Resources =====