May 2019 By PsychDB.com

Somatic Disorders

History and Controversy

Somatoform disorders in the DSM-IV-TR distinguished between 4 specific categories: somatisation disorder, hypochondriasis, pain disorder, and undifferentiated somatoform disorder. The DSM-5 replaced these with the single diagnosis: somatic symptom disorder, and introduced a new diagnosis: illness anxiety disorder. See the resource links below for further reading.

Somatoform disorders in the DSM-IV had 4 diagnoses: (1) somatisation disorder, (2) hypochondriasis, (3) pain disorder, and (4) undifferentiated somatoform disorder. The DSM-5 replaced these with the single diagnosis: somatic symptom disorder, and introduced the new diagnosis of illness anxiety disorder.

DSM-5 Somatic Disorders

DSM-5
Somatic Symptom Disorder Excessive anxiety & preoccupation with > 1 unexplained symptoms
Illness Anxiety Disorder Fear of having a serious illness despite few or no symptoms and consistently negative investigations
Conversion Disorder Neurologic symptom incompatible with any known neurologic disease; often acute onset associated with stress
Factitious Disorder Intentional falsification or inducement of symptoms with goal to assume sick role
Malingering (Not a actually diagnosis) Falsification or exaggeration of symptoms to obtain external incentives (secondary gain)

DSM-IV Somatic Disorders

Somatisation Disorder A history of many physical complaints before age 30 years over a period of several years and results in treatment being sought or significant impairment.
Hypochondriasis Preoccupation with fears of having or the idea of having a serious disease based on misinterpretation of bodily symptoms
Pain Disorder Pain in 1 or more anatomical sites of sufficient severity to warrant clinical attention and psychological factors play an important role in the severity/onset of the pain
Undifferentiated Somatoform Disorder 1 or more physical complaints, that after appropriate investigation, the symptoms cannot be fully explained by a known general medical condition